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smile4me
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« on: Fri 30 October, 2009 - 10:19 pm »

CANDIED (CRYSTALLIZED) ROSE AND OTHER PETALS: For flowers such as calendula, chrysanthemum, lavender, rose, tulip, and yucca, only the flower petals are edible. The white base of the petal, where it is attached to the flower, may have a bitter taste and should be removed from flowers such as chrysanthemums, dianthus, English daisies, marigolds, and roses. Break or cut off this portion before using. Separate the flower petals from the rest of the flower just prior to use to keep wilting to a minimum.

Candied Rose Petal Recipe: I like to crystallize plain and simple rose petals, in one color or in many -- they look so beautiful when decorating any dessert platter.
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1 cup rose petals
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1 cup sugar
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3/4 cup water
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Confectioner's sugar
Try making Rose Ice Cream. YUM!! Wouldn't it be perfect to serve at a wedding topped with Candied Rose Petals ?!

Wash rose petals gently and dry on paper towels. Trim away the ends, because they are bitter. Combine sugar and water in a saucepan and boil until it is 234 degrees F on a candy thermometer. Pour syrup into a bowl on a bed of cracked ice. When syrup begins to crystallize, hold petals with tweezers and dip. Dry petals on waxed paper and dust with confectioner' sugar.

 1 dozen flowers:

2 large egg whites, at room temperature
1 teaspoon water
1 dozen pesticide-free edible flowers, such as violets, marigolds, and rose petals
1 cup superfine sugar
NOTES:
List of Edible & Non-edible Flowers
Sources
   
bullet   Freshly picked edible flowers. The flowers in the Violas family (Pansies, Johnny Jump ups and Violets) are perfectly delightful when crystallized.
bullet   Scissors
bullet   Surgical tweezers
bullet   Watercolor paintbrush
bullet   Egg whites, use ONLY pasteurized powdered (for safety) or meringue powder, which I prefer -- tastes better (available from cake decorating stores)
bullet   Superfine sugar placed in a shaker or fine-holed strainer. (Sugar can be tinted with to match the flower by mixing in a little petal dusting powder).
bullet   Shallow bowl. 
bullet   Small container for egg whites
bullet   Tray covered with waxed or parchment paper
To Make:    1. Assemble all tools. 

2. Pick the freshest, fully opened, edible flowers early in the morning or late afternoon when water content in them is at its peak.

3. After harvest, flowers are best used immediately. If you have to store them,  place long-stemmed flowers or bouquets in water and then in a cool location. Short stemmed flowers should be placed between layers of damp paper toweling in an airtight container until ready for use. Once harvested, flowers will not keep long - even when refrigerated - so plan to serve within a few hours of harvesting. Before washing, test one flower for colorfastness by soaking it in water because some tend to discolor.

4. Immediately before washing, when portions of edible flowers are desired, pull petals or edible portions from fresh flowers and snip off the petals from the base of the flower. Remove the the pistils and stamens of all flowers except violas, Johnny-jump-ups, and pansies because the pollen can detract from the flavor of the flower as well as cause allergic reactions in susceptible individuals. For flowers such as calendula, chrysanthemum, lavender, rose, tulip, and yucca, only the flower petals are edible. The white base of the petal of many flowers may have a bitter taste and should be removed from flowers such as chrysanthemums, dianthus, marigolds, and roses.

5. Right before using, gently give the flowers a water bath to remove dirt and check for insects. To do, fill a small bowl with cool water and a pinch of salt. Let each flower or petal take a short bath in it. Afterwards, quickly dip the petals in ice water (remove ice before using) to perk them up and when done, place on paper towels. Let air dry. They must be completely dry before proceeding to the next step.

6. Dilute pasteurized, powdered egg whites or meringue powder with water. I sprinkle the powder over the surface of wide bowl of warm water and let sit (about 3 - 4 minutes) to dissolve before stirring. Resist the urge to stir it too soon because then the powder will clump. If it does, squish the clumps between your fingers while submerged in the water.

Hold the flower or petal with tweezers. Apply a thin layer of egg white mixture on each side with a small paintbrush in a thin, even layer. Any places not coated will turn brown.   

7. Holding the blossom over a bowl, sprinkle or shake superfine sugar in a clean salt shaker, over the entire flower. Tap the tweezers to remove excess sugar and repeat on reverse side.

8. I place my flowers on superfine sugar covered parchment or waxed paper to dry. They don't stick as much as they do when placed on a plain sheet. Let dry in a cool place to dry for 2 - 4 hours (in humid weather, it takes longer than 4-6 hours to dry). Hang larger flowers upside down to avoid squashing the petals.

Larger flowers, such as pansies or roses, need to be turned slightly on a regular basis to dry evenly. Moisture will collect under the smaller flower's petals that touch the parchment paper, so after a few hours, I move them around and turn them over so they don't stick.

9. When dry, pick up the flowers or petals with tweezers and set in frosting or garnish platter right before serving.
To Store:    Sugared flowers can be made in advance and stored in an airtight container up to a year in a cool, dry place.  Line an airtight container with soft padding, like Easter grass or excelsior (available at crafts stores). Cover with a piece of tulle on top. Arrange crystallized flowers in a single layer on tulle, then top with another piece of tulle. Add more layers until container is full. Store at room temperature.

CANDIED (CRYSTALLIZED) ROSE AND OTHER PETALS: For flowers such as calendula, chrysanthemum, lavender, rose, tulip, and yucca, only the flower petals are edible. The white base of the petal, where it is attached to the flower, may have a bitter taste and should be removed from flowers such as chrysanthemums, dianthus, English daisies, marigolds, and roses. Break or cut off this portion before using. Separate the flower petals from the rest of the flower just prior to use to keep wilting to a minimum.

Candied Rose Petal Recipe: I like to crystallize plain and simple rose petals, in one color or in many -- they look so beautiful when decorating any dessert platter.
bullet   

1 cup rose petals
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