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Author Topic: Another cool photo  (Read 3299 times)
Stu
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« on: Sat 8 September, 2012 - 09:34 am »



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On August 31st 2012 at 4.36 p.m. EDT a huge filament of solar material that had been hovering in the sun's corona erupted. Although it wasn't pointed directly at Earth, it still connected with our magnetosphere and was responsible for the rather stunning aurora that appeared on Monday Sept 3rd.

The Coronal Mass Ejection traveled at over 900 miles per second. This image shows the CME in comparison with a scale image of the Earth

check out the size of that makes you feel real tiny

http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=403307139734464&set=a.334832996581879.82450.334816523250193&type=1&relevant_count=1
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« Reply #1 on: Sat 8 September, 2012 - 10:43 am »

 eek
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« Reply #2 on: Sat 8 September, 2012 - 10:54 am »

Love those photo's, it certainly makes earth look small.
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« Reply #3 on: Sat 8 September, 2012 - 02:53 pm »

makes you realise how really insignificant we actually are.
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« Reply #4 on: Sat 8 September, 2012 - 02:54 pm »

Fark, hope that cameraman had sunblock eek
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« Reply #5 on: Sat 8 September, 2012 - 03:08 pm »

nah, it's ok, he took it at night 
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« Reply #6 on: Sat 8 September, 2012 - 03:10 pm »

Thank God
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1121 (+2087/-966) 
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« Reply #7 on: Sat 8 September, 2012 - 03:11 pm »

Thank God dance:
   i've never seen that sort of dance....



ha!  lucky edit there fella
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« Reply #8 on: Sat 8 September, 2012 - 03:13 pm »

I don't know what you mean :eek
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« Reply #9 on: Sat 8 September, 2012 - 03:13 pm »

who you calling an eek   
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« Reply #10 on: Sat 8 September, 2012 - 03:14 pm »

YOU ya rodent
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« Reply #11 on: Sat 8 September, 2012 - 03:16 pm »

 

























    haven't used that for a while
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Stu
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« Reply #12 on: Sun 9 September, 2012 - 06:50 pm »



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The Milky Way, seen from the Port Hills

Taken near Christchurch, New Zealand, the Milky Way is shown clearly over the Port Hills and the Sugar Loaf communications tower. The image was shot by Aaron Campbell on Thursday 9th Aug 2012, about 11.30pm; there was a new moon and the light pollution was at a relatively low level. Campbell used a 14-24mm @ 15mm/ f2.8, iso2000, 30secs.

-TEL

Photo: Aaron Campbell
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=370665549672291&set=a.369158889822957.84758.360342597371253&type=3&theater
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« Reply #13 on: Sun 9 September, 2012 - 08:22 pm »

Beautiful Smiley
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« Reply #14 on: Mon 22 July, 2013 - 09:58 am »



Earth and Moon as seen from Saturn, photographed by Cassini on Friday July 19 2013

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/raw/rawimagedetails/index.cfm?imageID=294988
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« Reply #15 on: Mon 22 July, 2013 - 10:02 am »

like diamonds in the sky 
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« Reply #16 on: Mon 22 July, 2013 - 02:38 pm »

I like this:



Quote
"Consider again that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity – in all this vastness – there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.
The Earth is the only world known, so far, to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment, the Earth is where we make our stand. It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known."

—Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space, 1997 reprint, pp. xv–xvi

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=633273620026986&set=a.456449604376056.98921.367116489976035&type=1&relevant_count=1&ref=nf
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« Reply #17 on: Mon 22 July, 2013 - 02:49 pm »

I really like that too.
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« Reply #18 on: Tue 23 July, 2013 - 11:15 am »

I like this:



Quote
"Consider again that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that in glory and triumph they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner. How frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity – in all this vastness – there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.
The Earth is the only world known, so far, to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment, the Earth is where we make our stand. It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known."

—Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot: A Vision of the Human Future in Space, 1997 reprint, pp. xv–xvi

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=633273620026986&set=a.456449604376056.98921.367116489976035&type=1&relevant_count=1&ref=nf
he says it so well
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« Reply #19 on: Wed 14 August, 2013 - 03:37 pm »



not a photo obviously, but again shows how tiny and insignificant we are

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2012/3390.html
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« Reply #20 on: Thu 15 August, 2013 - 01:11 am »

    I love the photos of outerspace
 they make me go all dreamy 


 
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« Reply #21 on: Thu 15 August, 2013 - 07:01 pm »

.
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« Reply #22 on: Mon 19 August, 2013 - 09:53 pm »

Holy f**k, that's amazing.  eek
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« Reply #23 on: Sun 16 February, 2014 - 01:48 pm »



Quote
The actual sizes of various different deep space objects. If they were brighter, this is how they would appear in our night sky. The images are in scale with one another, including the Moon, but not to the Milky Way background.

1. The Moon.
2. Andromeda Galaxy.
3. Triangulum Galaxy.
4. Orion Nebula.
5. Lagoon Nebula.
6. Pinwheel Galaxy.
7. Sculptor Galaxy.
8. Supernova remnant 1006.
9. Veil Nebula.
10. Helix Nebula.
11. Sombrero Galaxy.
12. Crab Nebula.
13. Comet Hale-Bopp (c. 1997)
14. Venus.
15. Jupiter.
16. International Space Station.

Image by u/aerospacerocket on Reddit.
Original photograph http://bit.ly/1cJp0PR
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« Reply #24 on: Mon 17 February, 2014 - 12:50 pm »

http://www.policymic.com/articles/81873/experience-just-how-big-the-universe-is-in-one-mind-blowing-interactive?utm_source=upworthy

This is fun, gives ya a bit of perspective.
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« Reply #25 on: Sun 11 May, 2014 - 06:11 pm »



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Super Simulator Produces A Virtual Universe

Mark Vogelsberger of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics has been collaborating with several scientists and research institutions all around the world to create a simulation software that could produce a virtual universe. The purpose of this project, and others like it, is to see if astronomers can reproduce what we observe in our actual universe.

"Until now, no single simulation was able to reproduce the universe on both large and small scales simultaneously," said Mark.

The simulator, dubbed Illustris, is a very complex program which contains over 100,000 lines of code and the hardware required to run it is no less complex. It had to be spread out over many supercomputers and 8,000 processors, all working in parallel with each other. Researchers said that if such a program were to run on an average home computer or laptop, it would take over two thousand years to complete the simulation.

The end result is this image you see here. They began the simulation at 12 million years after the Big Bang and set it in motion within a 350 million light year wide virtual cube. After 3 months of 'run time', Illustris created a 13 billion year-old virtual universe, and the results were even more amazing than the fact that the simulator could accomplish this feat at all. Not only did Illustris create a universe that has a cosmic filament type structure like our own universe, it had managed to create over 41,000 galaxies in all different shapes. It created disk, elliptical and irregular galaxies and even galaxy super clusters.

The benefit to this type of simulation? Astronomers can use Illustris to view the virtual universe in the same way we observe our own universe in real time, but they can also use it to see things the way they were in the past. For instance, if a galaxy is a billion light years away, then the light we are seeing is showing the galaxy as it was a billion years ago. With Illustris, they can view the galaxy in different times simultaneously.

"Illustris is like a time machine. We can go forward and backward in time. We can pause the simulation and zoom into a single galaxy or galaxy cluster to see what's really going on," says co-author Shy Genel of the Ceter for Astrophysics.

Along with such a brilliant image, researchers were also able to produce a simulation video to show us the progression of Illustris' virtual universe, all of which is linked below.

-TAZ

IMAGE CREDIT: Illustris Collaboration

SOURCE: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/05/140507142849.htm

VIDEO: http://youtu.be/NjSFR40SY58.
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« Reply #26 on: Sun 11 May, 2014 - 07:26 pm »

there is a belief that our universe is part of a simulation  eek
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« Reply #27 on: Sun 11 May, 2014 - 08:11 pm »

Awesome!  eek
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