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Author Topic: Who uses Chrome as their browser of choice?  (Read 745 times)
Brain
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« on: Sun 19 January, 2014 - 10:16 am »

BEWARE!!!!

http://arstechnica.com/security/2014/01/malware-vendors-buy-chrome-extensions-to-send-adware-filled-updates/

Quote
To make matters worse, ownership of a Chrome extension can be transferred to another party, and users are never informed when an ownership change happens. Malware and adware vendors have caught wind of this and have started showing up at the doors of extension authors, looking to buy their extensions. Once the deal is done and the ownership of the extension is transferred, the new owners can issue an ad-filled update over Chrome's update service, which sends the adware out to every user of that extension.


I guess this could happen with other browsers, but Chromes automatic invisible updates makes it a target for the adware dealers.
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Mr Nice Guy
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« Reply #1 on: Sun 19 January, 2014 - 06:23 pm »

Call it the attack of the zombie refrigerators.

Computer security researchers said this week they discovered a large “botnet” which infected Internet-connected home appliances and then delivered more than 750,000 malicious emails.

The California security firm Proofpoint, Inc., which announced its findings, said this may be the first proven “Internet of Things” based cyberattack involving “smart” appliances.


Proofpoint said hackers managed to penetrate home-networking routers, connected multi-media centers, televisions and at least one refrigerator to create a botnet — or platform to deliver malicious or phishing emails from a device, usually without the owner’s knowledge.

Security experts previously spoke of such attacks as theoretical.

But Proofpoint said the case “has significant security implications for device owners and enterprise targets” because of massive growth expected in the use of smart and connected devices, from clothing to appliances.

“Proofpoint’s findings reveal that cyber criminals have begun to commandeer home routers, smart appliances and other components of the Internet of Things and transform them into ‘thingbots,’” to carry out the same kinds of attacks normally associated with personal computers.
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Mr Nice Guy
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« Reply #2 on: Wed 22 January, 2014 - 04:58 pm »

More scary Chromeness



"Toying around with voice-recognition apps, developer Tal Ater noticed something strange. Because of a quirk in Chrome's microphone settings, any site enabled for voice-recognition could use a pop-up window to keep recording almost indefinitely, hidden in the background. In Ater's demonstration, he closes the tab and continues talking, only to reveal a pop-up behind the main Chrome window, transcribing everything he says. It's an unsettling thought: could a malicious site use Chrome to listen in on users' offline conversations?

ATER FIRST REPORTED THE BUG IN SEPTEMBER

The core of the problem is Chrome's microphone permissions policy. Once you've given an HTTPS-enabled site permission to use your microphone in Chrome, every instance of the site has permission, even windows that pop up unnoticed in the background. And since the code is running in a different window, it won't set off any of Chrome's recording icons. By all appearances, the site won't be accessing the computer at all. The only sure defense is to manually revoke the microphone permission, which most users would never think to do."
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Stu
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« Reply #3 on: Wed 22 January, 2014 - 05:23 pm »

I don't like Chrome, but I'm stuck with it on my Android and Apple devices, won't use it on my main PC unless I'm testing s**t.  There was a big buzz about Chrome at one stage, but I stayed true to Firefox throughout
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Brain
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« Reply #4 on: Wed 22 January, 2014 - 09:44 pm »

Apparently google is starting to block extensions in the chrome webstore that are hijacking things.
Unless they test each one individually i guess they can only block them once it's known they are malicious.
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« Reply #5 on: Tue 28 January, 2014 - 10:22 am »

Scary stuff Brain
I changed to Chrome because there are a couple of extensions I needed that aren't on Firefox but I did have to deactivate a couple of extensions that went haywire with advertising.

I might check and see if those extensions are now on FF
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« Reply #6 on: Wed 12 February, 2014 - 10:52 pm »

i go for firefox every time no particular reason other than i like it


and my keyboard lights up
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